Search
Close this search box.
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors

Preparing youth for a complex future

Our world is full of complex and interconnected challenges, from the deepening climate crisis to rapid biodiversity loss, global health issues, and the growth of misinformation and disinformation. Education in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) is more important than ever.

“It helps young people adapt and thrive in a rapidly changing world,” says Dr. Bonnie Schmidt, President and Founder of Let’s Talk Science.

“STEM develops the problem-solving, self-directed learning, and collaboration skills youth will need for future citizenship and work demands. It prepares them for jobs in key areas and prepares them for work in a sustainable economy. It fuels economic prosperity built on innovation.”

Let’s Talk Science is a charitable organization committed to fostering interest and engagement in STEM among Canadian youth.

“A scientifically literate and STEM-skilled population benefits us all – that’s what our organization is all about.”

Most Canadian students don’t take biology, chemistry, physics or computer science in Grade 12. And the number of domestic university graduates in STEM has been dropping steadily for more than a decade.

Let’s Talk Science provides programming from early years to Grade 12, working with educators to break down barriers to STEM and ignite a sense of wonder and curiosity in children and youth. They also offer free, bilingual programs and resources on their website.

“Tomorrow’s leaders must be able to think critically, ask the right questions, and assess evidence appropriately when making both personal and political decisions,” says Laura Elliott, Executive Director for the Council of Ontario Directors of Education.

“Understanding how science works is essential to maintain a healthy democracy.”

Let’s Talk Science has worked closely with Canadian school boards over the past 30 years, and Dr. Schmidt says their work is far from over.

“We want to see STEM curriculums become more relevant, issues-based, student-centred, experiential, and multi-disciplinary. We want to embrace Indigenous knowledge alongside traditional Western science. And we want to encourage and support gender and cultural diversity and foster a ‘science identity’ in our young people.”

Introducing more young people to positive role models in science encourages them to study science through high school and shows them pathways and careers in STEM.

“This is about getting people ready for jobs and responsible citizenship. It’s about building a just and sustainable future.”

“Discover free, bilingual, easy-to-use resources at letstalkscience.ca. Because how we educate our kids is how we change our future.

TEXT SHELANNE AUGUSTINE

www.LetsTalkScience.ca

MUSKOKA

The Ridge is closer than you think

Enjoying a relaxed golf experience with friends and family while immersed in some of the most incredible scenery in Ontario is just one of

REAL ESTATE

Rational thinking returns to property valuations

As the real estate market adjustment continues after the recent two-and-a-half-year boom, property values are slowly but surely reflecting actual value. Attributes such as

HOME & COTTAGE

Make the most of the season

While many boaters choose to moor at sunset, Moe Elnewishy, General Manager of Lefroy Harbour, says there’s no reason the fun has to end